Walking in Jumilla: the Cañada Real from Murcia to Cuenca
46 kilometres of the old drovers’ road run through the municipality of Jumilla The “Cañadas Reales” are the long-distance transhumance farming paths, or drovers’ roads, traditionally used to drive livestock from one location to another according to the season, and the route which led from Cartagena on the coast to Cuenca in central eastern Spain passes very close to the centre of Jumilla. It therefore offers a walking or mountain..

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Walking in Sierra del Carche in Jumilla
Dramatic scenery above the vineyards and salt mines of south-eastern Jumilla The regional park of Sierra del Carche occupies an area of 5,942 hectares, and includes the Cabezo de la Rosa – a saline diapir of great geological interest – and deep ravines such as those of San Cristóbal, La Guarafía and La Yedra, which in times of heavy rainfall feature waterfalls at El Saltador. Here the Mediterranean flora includes Aleppo and maritime..

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Walking in Sierra de la Cingla in Jumilla
Prehistoric rock art and spectacular scenery in the mountains of Sierra de la Cingla The main walking routes in the mountains of Sierra de la Cingla, the ridge which runs along the northern side of the N-344 road between Jumilla and Yecla, are full of historical and environmental significance, featuring stretches of road, paths, tracks and even ravines as they make their way through the rural districts of La Alquería and Fuente del Pino...

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The Charco del Zorro beauty spot just outside Jumilla
A popular spot for a day out among locals just behind the castle hill Many visitors to the town of Jumilla in the north of the region of Murcia don’t have enough time to venture round to the “other” side of the hill on which the castle stands, but locals who are in the know are all aware that here there is a charming beauty spot which is popular for picnics and swimming in the summer. This is the body of water named “Charco..

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Walking in Sierra de Santa Ana in Jumilla
Spectacular scenery, prehistoric archaeology, the monastery of Santa Ana and thick pine woods in the mountains outside Jumilla The mountains of Sierra de Santa Ana are just 6 kilometres south of the town of Jumilla, and offer not only a stunning landscape of great environmental importance but also routes which include sites of special historical importance. The area can be reached by car before walkers can choose among various footpaths..

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Walking in Sierra de La Pedrera in Jumilla
Caves with a story to tell and other sights which illustrate history and pre-history The Sierra de la Pedrera may reach no higher than 765 metres above sea level, but the area is covered in esparto glass and aromatic plants and is home to historic and prehistoric remains. In one rock shelter there is a series of schematic rock art paintings which are part of the World Heritage Site declared by UNESCO, dating from between the Stone Age and..

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